ADHD Quick Facts: Finding a Professional to Diagnose and Treat ADHD

Questions to Ask Many healthcare professionals can diagnose ADHD: psychiatrists, pediatricians, neurologists, psychologists, clinical social workers, nurse practitioners, and licensed counselors or therapists. Only certain medical professionals can prescribe medication and conduct tests to rule out other possible causes of symptoms: physicians (MD or DO), nurse practitioners (NP), and physician assistants (PA) who are supervised…

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ADHD Quick Facts: Complementary Interventions for ADHD

Parents often look for interventions that will work together with—or even in place of—the recommended treatments for ADHD. ADHD treatments that are supported by solid research include medication, behavioral treatments such as behavior management strategies, parent training, and school programs that include accommodations. Interventions that are complementary to recommended treatments include dietary approaches, nutritional supplements,…

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ADHD Quick Facts: Medication in ADHD Treatment

Medication can be an important part of ADHD treatment. It can help to control symptoms, helping a child stay on task and pay attention. It can only be prescribed by medical professionals, not other professionals. An accurate ADHD diagnosis is needed, including an evaluation for other possible diagnoses, before medication is prescribed. Each family must…

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ADHD Quick Facts: Behavior Management in ADHD Treatment

Behavior therapy including behavior modification is a critical part of ADHD treatment for children and teens. Solid scientific evidence shows that behavioral treatment can be effective for many children. The severity and type of ADHD may play a role in treatment decisions, which should be tailored to the unique needs of each child and family.…

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ADHD Quick Facts: ADHD Presentations

Three Possible ADHD Presentations Children need to exhibit six or more symptoms in two or more settings for a diagnosis; older teens and adults should have at least five of the symptoms. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) lists three presentations of ADHD—Predominantly Inattentive, Hyperactive-Impulsive, and Combined. Inattentive Often: Fails to give…

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ADHD Quick Facts: About ADHD

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder—ADHD—is a brain-based disorder that affects about one in ten school-aged children. Symptoms continue into adulthood for more than half of those who have it in childhood. People who have ADHD have higher levels of inattention, impulsivity, and/or hyperactivity than their peers. Executive function often is generally impaired when individuals have ADHD. This affects…

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ADHD Medications Approved by the US FDA (infographic)

Treatment of ADHD with medication is most effective for reducing the core symptoms of ADHD—inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several kinds of medications for ADHD that include stimulants (methylphenidate-based and amphetamine-based products) and nonstimulants including atomoxetine and antihypertensives (alpha-2 adrenergic agonists). These medications are listed in the…

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ADHD and Sleep Disorders Diagnosis and Management

Sleep disorders are common among people with ADHD. If you have trouble sleeping, you’ll probably feel the effects at school or work, in your relationships, and while driving and going about your daily life. Diagnosing a sleep disorder Telling a doctor or mental health provider about sleep problems is an important place to start. They’ll…

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ADHD and Sleep Disorders

Many children and adults who have ADHD also have a sleep disorder—almost three out of four children and adolescents, and up to four out of five adults with ADHD. Not getting enough sleep, or needing to sleep at times that don’t mesh with school or work obligations, can have significant long-term effects. Those can include…

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ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, includes what used to be called Autistic Disorder, Asperger syndrome, or Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified, all of which affect a person’s social and emotional skills and nonverbal communication. ASD has many similarities to ADHD, but there are also differences between the two. Can a person be diagnosed…

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ADHD and Coexisting Conditions (infographic)

More than two-thirds of individuals with ADHD have at least one other coexisting condition.  This infographic looks at the conditions that co-occur often with ADHD,  including anxiety, depression, learning disorders, Tourette syndrome, speech problems, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), bipolar disorder, sleep problems and substance abuse.

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Podcasts

Podcasts from the National Resource Center on ADHD address a variety of topics on ADHD, including interventions and tips for parents, adults, educators and other professionals. Listen to the podcasts on SoundCloud or on iTunes.

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