How to Say the Right Thing at the Right Time

How to Say the Right Thing at the Right Time

Often people with ADHD have a history of saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. Maybe we make a cringe-worthy comment we wish we could immediately take back. Other times we don’t know what to say and we just fumble along. Or we monologue and stumble into inappropriate comments. This history makes us afraid…

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Bomb-Proof Your Jokes

Humor can be tricky. With ADHD, it can be even trickier. If your joke won’t land or you can’t hit the punch line, the awkward silence that follows can be deafening. Jokes change depending on the group, the situation, and the people. Humor is largely about timing, intention, and reading the room. Is your joke…

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Friendship Problems? How Parents Can Help

“Your son is getting better at turning in his homework,” said Spencer’s fourth grade teacher. “However, the other students don’t want to sit at his table. I notice that at recess he is often alone, and I worry about him socially.” Spencer’s parents reflect on this statement. Indeed, they have noticed that invitations to birthday…

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Pre-Game Your Social Strategy

Want to improve your social network? “Just showing up” is rarely a good plan, especially for adults with ADHD in social situations. Bombarded by stimulation, swamped with anticipatory anxiety, flooded with emotions, and feeling you have lost the ability to self-regulate can make socializing both draining and overwhelming for people with ADHD. For many of…

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I’m Fine, Thank You Very Much!

“My daughter is so sassy! I try to help her make friends, but she will not take my advice.” Many parents of tweens and teens with ADHD struggle as they watch their child ignore overtures of friendship, cling to friends who don’t treat them well, or ignore advice and make mistakes that ultimately leave them…

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The Imagine Neighborhood, Where Children (and Adults) Learn About Feelings

Joyce Cooper-Kahn, PhD, interviews Scotty Iseri and Sherri Widen, PhD Imagination and pretend play have long been considered a foundation for the development of behavioral and emotional regulation—see, for example, the work of psychologists Dorothy and Jerome Singer. Both the process of imagining and the specific rehearsal of situations that are part of pretend play…

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Teach Your Child to Read the Room

WE’VE ALL SEEN SIGNS OF A CHILD who doesn’t quite know how to follow the unwritten rules of proper etiquette. The child with ADHD who barges into someone’s house and sits on the couch in a wet bathing suit. The teenager who tries to get the attention of his teacher while she is hurriedly packing…

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Camp Can Be a Place to Thrive

For many parents whose children have ADHD or are twice-exceptional, summer marks the end of a school year rife with organizational, social, and academic challenges. From homework hassles to organizational black holes and home/school communications, a high level of frustration can develop in both parents and children. Research-informed summer camps provide an opportunity for children…

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